Alexander Skarsgard photographed by Tim Barber for Bullett Magazine

(Source: cyberqueer, via thetinmanheart)

mydarkenedeyes:

Cheol hee Lim | Tumblr - Stranger (2013-)

(via crazeemuse)

Tags: Stranger

hoedere:

mol-bay:

what in the fuck does my sister think she’s doing?

god’s work

hoedere:

mol-bay:

what in the fuck does my sister think she’s doing?

god’s work

(via s-h-i-b-a)

Tags: God's work

spheral3art:

Still geeking over Markiplier’s playthrough of OFF. SO GOOD!! Markiplier wonders if he’s done good.

spheral3art:

Still geeking over Markiplier’s playthrough of OFF. SO GOOD!!
Markiplier wonders if he’s done good.

spheral3art:

Markiplier as the Batter from OFF. Love this game!

spheral3art:

Markiplier as the Batter from OFF. Love this game!

saydox:

Ang Lee is a good cook and was a full-time house-husband for six years.

(via biwinningism)

glitter-and-be-gay:

squonkhunter:

"Forgive me, my Queen…"
Monostatos is my most tragic character.
Design from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute (1791).
For more on my adaptation, see my blog! http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

Not to be a pain in the ass, but why are all your characters white? It’s specified in the libretto that Tamino is Japanese and Monostatos is black. What’s the point of Papageno saying “Bin ich nicht ein Narr, daß ich mich schrecken ließ? Es gibt doch auch schwarze Vögel auf der Welt, warum denn nicht auch schwarze Menschen?”, then?
I’m sorry, I just take Magic Flute really seriously.

Hello, glitter-and-be-gay, thank you for asking. To be fair, I have not uploaded all of my character designs as of yet. Since this is a fantasy, the continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa as we know them do not actually exist in this realm, but some of the characters, arguably, can look to be of European descent. It’s strange that you said all of my characters are white, as I have uploaded Pamina, and she looks to be of Korean descent. To be fair to you, though, you might not have seen that earlier post, and I have not uploaded anything of Sarastro, who looks to be of African descent.
As far as taking The Magic Flute seriously, I have scoured through the original text and full score multiple times. I am so dedicated to this piece, I have learnt pieces of it on the piano and in fact, when I was a young girl about the age of seven, I decided to learn German for the specific reason that The Magic Flute was in German and I wanted to know what the characters were saying.
Sixteen years later, I understand the entire script, and have read Mozart’s letters to and from Schikaneder concerning the matter. I have seen countless performances of all three different versions of The Magic Flute and am currently in possession of the most verbose one that contains all the scenes that are normally cut out. I take this opera enormously seriously, and you can be sure that I take this adaptation just as seriously.
The adaptation to comic form changes the storyline to fit the darkness and epic nature of the music. The music in itself contains all the psychology that Schikaneder did not place in the libretto, for example, Tamino’s insecurities (the frailness in the notes, the fact that he’s the highest Mozart tenor there is, the support he needs from the music in order to complete an idea, and the constant questioning and hesitation that fits him musically, all of which is Mozart’s doing and not Schikaneder’s). Thus I am riffing off of many of the main themes and adding back story so that the scenes that do occur within the opera contain as much weight visually as they would when paired with the music. This is a unique challenge when working in a purely visual medium.
Insofar as to why Monostatos is portrayed as white, the only real purpose he was portrayed as a Moor in the first place was to appeal to the mentalities of the time. If you look in the stage directions in the libretto, Schikaneder doesn’t even refer to his own character by name. He simply calls him “der Mohr.” Even to his own author, Monostatos was nothing but the color of his skin, an unappealing, ugly, fat, apish man whose attractions for the chalk-skinned and pallid Pamina are both disgusting and humorous.
To an 18th century audience.
That is not something I want to replicate in a 21st century comic. The power of The Magic Flute is its immense and chameleon-like ability to adapt to any country or any time’s sentiments (just look at Impempe Yomlingo’s adaptation of the piece, where South African instruments play Mozart’s original melodies in an all-black cast where the Queen of the Night is a colonial presence, it’s absolutely brilliant!). The point is, the piece is about the triumph of good over evil. Now, what that good or evil is depends on the opinion of the person adapting the piece.
For my personal adaptation, the good represented by Day is Love. The evil represented by Night is Fear. This works for me, as I view fear to be the opposite of love (Why are people racist? Because they lack understanding towards the opposite party and do not attempt to understand out of fear.). For my piece, I argue that race does not matter and I show this by portraying different ethnicity in characters and yet letting them react to one another as if race did not matter. They treat each other like human beings and accuse each other based on actions or on social status which is determined by employment or noble birth, and nothing to do with race.
With my Monostatos, I just drew the character who popped into my head. I did the same with Sarastro. Sarastro ended up black. Monostatos ended up white. It doesn’t actually matter, as long as you stick to what the characters represent at their core, and what is expressed in the soul of the music, not by specific dialogue. I wanted to capture the feeling of being an outsider in Monostatos, of being conscious that everyone hates him, but I have built him a back story that provides that information rather than toss around the word “Moor” and point fingers at how ugly, stupid, and manipulative he is. Rather, we are able to sympathize with or damn Monostatos based on his actions rather than the color of his skin, yet I keep the same jilted mentality and manipulative personality of the original. The shell in which this entity occupies should not matter, even if it conflicts with the details of the original because, in the end, it is not the details that make The Magic Flute the masterpiece it is. It is the music that reaches to eternity, its unique ability to adapt, and the universal triumph of good over evil.
I hope this is a sufficient reason and that you understand I deeply revere this opera, yet respect it enough to see its faults and change it to bring out more of its beauty.
Thank you,
Paula aka. squonkhunter

glitter-and-be-gay:

squonkhunter:

"Forgive me, my Queen…"

Monostatos is my most tragic character.

Design from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute (1791).

For more on my adaptation, see my blog! http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

Not to be a pain in the ass, but why are all your characters white? It’s specified in the libretto that Tamino is Japanese and Monostatos is black. What’s the point of Papageno saying “Bin ich nicht ein Narr, daß ich mich schrecken ließ? Es gibt doch auch schwarze Vögel auf der Welt, warum denn nicht auch schwarze Menschen?”, then?

I’m sorry, I just take Magic Flute really seriously.

Hello, glitter-and-be-gay, thank you for asking. To be fair, I have not uploaded all of my character designs as of yet. Since this is a fantasy, the continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa as we know them do not actually exist in this realm, but some of the characters, arguably, can look to be of European descent. It’s strange that you said all of my characters are white, as I have uploaded Pamina, and she looks to be of Korean descent. To be fair to you, though, you might not have seen that earlier post, and I have not uploaded anything of Sarastro, who looks to be of African descent.

As far as taking The Magic Flute seriously, I have scoured through the original text and full score multiple times. I am so dedicated to this piece, I have learnt pieces of it on the piano and in fact, when I was a young girl about the age of seven, I decided to learn German for the specific reason that The Magic Flute was in German and I wanted to know what the characters were saying.

Sixteen years later, I understand the entire script, and have read Mozart’s letters to and from Schikaneder concerning the matter. I have seen countless performances of all three different versions of The Magic Flute and am currently in possession of the most verbose one that contains all the scenes that are normally cut out. I take this opera enormously seriously, and you can be sure that I take this adaptation just as seriously.

The adaptation to comic form changes the storyline to fit the darkness and epic nature of the music. The music in itself contains all the psychology that Schikaneder did not place in the libretto, for example, Tamino’s insecurities (the frailness in the notes, the fact that he’s the highest Mozart tenor there is, the support he needs from the music in order to complete an idea, and the constant questioning and hesitation that fits him musically, all of which is Mozart’s doing and not Schikaneder’s). Thus I am riffing off of many of the main themes and adding back story so that the scenes that do occur within the opera contain as much weight visually as they would when paired with the music. This is a unique challenge when working in a purely visual medium.

Insofar as to why Monostatos is portrayed as white, the only real purpose he was portrayed as a Moor in the first place was to appeal to the mentalities of the time. If you look in the stage directions in the libretto, Schikaneder doesn’t even refer to his own character by name. He simply calls him “der Mohr.” Even to his own author, Monostatos was nothing but the color of his skin, an unappealing, ugly, fat, apish man whose attractions for the chalk-skinned and pallid Pamina are both disgusting and humorous.

To an 18th century audience.

That is not something I want to replicate in a 21st century comic. The power of The Magic Flute is its immense and chameleon-like ability to adapt to any country or any time’s sentiments (just look at Impempe Yomlingo’s adaptation of the piece, where South African instruments play Mozart’s original melodies in an all-black cast where the Queen of the Night is a colonial presence, it’s absolutely brilliant!). The point is, the piece is about the triumph of good over evil. Now, what that good or evil is depends on the opinion of the person adapting the piece.

For my personal adaptation, the good represented by Day is Love. The evil represented by Night is Fear. This works for me, as I view fear to be the opposite of love (Why are people racist? Because they lack understanding towards the opposite party and do not attempt to understand out of fear.). For my piece, I argue that race does not matter and I show this by portraying different ethnicity in characters and yet letting them react to one another as if race did not matter. They treat each other like human beings and accuse each other based on actions or on social status which is determined by employment or noble birth, and nothing to do with race.

With my Monostatos, I just drew the character who popped into my head. I did the same with Sarastro. Sarastro ended up black. Monostatos ended up white. It doesn’t actually matter, as long as you stick to what the characters represent at their core, and what is expressed in the soul of the music, not by specific dialogue. I wanted to capture the feeling of being an outsider in Monostatos, of being conscious that everyone hates him, but I have built him a back story that provides that information rather than toss around the word “Moor” and point fingers at how ugly, stupid, and manipulative he is. Rather, we are able to sympathize with or damn Monostatos based on his actions rather than the color of his skin, yet I keep the same jilted mentality and manipulative personality of the original. The shell in which this entity occupies should not matter, even if it conflicts with the details of the original because, in the end, it is not the details that make The Magic Flute the masterpiece it is. It is the music that reaches to eternity, its unique ability to adapt, and the universal triumph of good over evil.

I hope this is a sufficient reason and that you understand I deeply revere this opera, yet respect it enough to see its faults and change it to bring out more of its beauty.

Thank you,

Paula aka. squonkhunter

"Forgive me, my Queen…"
Monostatos is my most tragic character.
Design from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute (1791).
For more on my adaptation, see my blog! http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

"Forgive me, my Queen…"

Monostatos is my most tragic character.

Design from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute (1791).

For more on my adaptation, see my blog! http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

four screenwriters [mel brooks]

(via hanniballecters)

Some of you might remember an earlier sketch of Tamino with war paint. He starts that way out in the comic, but I thought it was about time I update his look, since this is more of who he is, and only Pamina can bring this side of him out.
Tamino is a design for Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute. For more on the adaptation, visit my blog: http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

Some of you might remember an earlier sketch of Tamino with war paint. He starts that way out in the comic, but I thought it was about time I update his look, since this is more of who he is, and only Pamina can bring this side of him out.

Tamino is a design for Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s last opera, The Magic Flute. For more on the adaptation, visit my blog: http://squonkhunter.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/announcing-a-new-project-tamino-and-the-magic-flute/

Tags: cathartic

ladyhistory:

The Fun-Filled Captioned Adventures of George Washington

PART I | PART II | PART III | PART IV | PART V | PART VI | PART VII | PART VIII | PART IX | PART X | PART XI | PART XII | PART XIII | PART XIV

(via europeansdomusicalsbetter)

Tamino and Pamina from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s fantastical opera The Magic Flute.

Tamino and Pamina from Tamino and the Magic Flute, my graphic novel adaptation of Mozart’s fantastical opera The Magic Flute.

kittyune:

I can’t decide if I should sell or keep this book. The illustrations are drool worthy.

KEEP. KEEP FOREVER. PASS ONTO YOUR CHILDREN.

(via rosengeist)

Tags: droooooooool

staceythinx:

Volume Rendering CT scans by voxel123 

(via baneofkings)